Inside the December 2021 Edition of USA Lacrosse Magazine


Everyone’s talking about Sixes.

World Lacrosse went full steam ahead with its new 6v6 discipline of the sport, putting it in the hands of some of the best lacrosse players on the planet at the Super Sixes event in October featuring teams from Canada, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy and the U.S. What a spectacle it was. Highlights galore.

And yes, for the naysayers, plenty of room for improvement.

But if we believe in the Olympic vision — if we think putting the sport (in any form) in front of a global TV audience of more than 3 billion people and incentivizing nations to develop it robustly within their borders is good for the game — then shouldn’t we give it a chance?

Numerical symmetry aside, these are my six takeaways from World Lacrosse Super Sixes.

1. Players love it.

Unequivocally, they do. While the new discipline has met mixed reviews from fans on social media, it’s got the thumbs up from the pros who have played it — as well as a few who wish they could try their hand at it. John Grant Jr., Chris Passavia and John Grant Jr. were among those lamenting that Sixes did not exist at the height of their playing days. The discipline has been compared for better and worse to the continuous 3v2 drill called West Genny — which happened to be what the 2018 U.S. men’s team chose to play exclusively during a players-only weekend at Hofstra in advance of the world championship.

2. It’s very Olympic.

This discipline was created with one goal in mind: Get lacrosse back into the Olympics. And anyone who watched the Tokyo Games this summer could see what World Lacrosse envisioned when creating Sixes. It’s helter-skelter lacrosse, back-and-forth action with few stoppages, high scoring, elite speed and incredible skill.

3. It lacks narrative.

We’re storytellers by trade. My chief criticism of Sixes is that there’s no arc to the game. There’s no build or momentum shifts. It all unfolds so fast. Key moments get lost in the shuffle. With goalies digging the ball out of the cage and immediately putting it back in play, there are no goal celebrations or dramatic draws.

4. It’s not box.

It’s not field, either. It truly is a hybrid. But those who dismissed Sixes as outdoor box lacrosse — understandable considering the 6v6 format featuring a goalie and five runners playing in a more confined setting — or hockey on grass were mistaken. There’s no forechecking, off-ball contact or boards, which makes it a different game.

5. It levels the playing field.

No one has the depth of lacrosse talent as Canada and the United States, who have combined to win 40 of the 43 world championships ever contested— field, box, men, women and U20. The World Lacrosse Sixes roster limit of 12 reduces the advantage even within the rivalry. A week after getting scorched by the U.S. 19-3 in the traditional field discipline at the USA Lacrosse Fall Classic, the Canadian women defeated the U.S. 17-14 then fell 14-11 in a Super Sixes split.

6. It invites strategy.

Play 4-on-5 defense with a hanger up top? It’s worth trying. Teams will continue to experiment with the new discipline to see what sticks — and what might one day carry them to the Olympic podium.

— Matt DaSilva, Editor in Chief

This article appears in the Deecember edition of USA Lacrosse Magazine. Join our momentum.

"While the new discipline has met mixed reviews from fans on social media, it’s got the thumbs up from the pros who have played it."


THE OPEN
DECEMBER 2021

FROM THE CEO
THE FIRST HUNDRED DAYS

Marc Riccio updates USA Lacrosse members on his first 100 days as CEO.
By Marc Riccio

WE ARE USA LACROSSE
SOL SISTERS

The Miami Sol girls' lacrosse club introduces sport to athletes from Hispanic communities.
By Paul Ohanian

LIFE AFTER LAX
NO SUCH THING AS UNKNOWN

Former Purdue lacrosse player and Blue Origin VP Audrey Powers on flying into space with Captain Kirk.
By Matt DaSilva

GAME READY
NOVEMBER 2021

REACH FOR THE SKY
JACK ROWLETT AND THE OVER-THE-HEAD CHECK

Rowlett on when and how to go for broke with an over-the-head check.
By Nelson Rice

GAME SHAPE
DISGUISING CONDITIONING WITH THE U.S. WOMEN

Relay races, tic-tac-toe and more fun ways the U.S. women disguise conditioning.
By Matt Hamilton

A HEAD FOR EVERY STYLE

No matter what position or style you play, you can't go wrong with Maverik.
Sponsored Content

A MOMENT IN TIME

AXIA's custom watchees commemorate milestones with style and quality.
Sponsored Content

JUST SET UP AND PLAY

Sport Resource Group's ProWall containment systems let you run box games anywhere.
Sponsored Content








FEATURES
DECEMBER 2021

FEAR NO EAGLE
U.S. WOMEN'S NATIONAL TEAM

Meet the new Sam Apuzzo. She won't scare easily.
By Matt Hamilton

A CLEAN SLATE
U.S. MEN'S NATIONAL TEAM

The U.S. men have their sights set on 2023.
By Matt DaSilva and Nelson Rice

IN THE PRESENCE OF LEGENDS
COLLEGE MEN

Gait, Petro and the Syracuse reformation.
By Nelson Rice

2021: The Year Lacrosse Came Back

YOU can vote on WHO wins our #BestOfLax end-of-year awards.
By Staff

PHOTOS OF THE YEAR

The best moments of the year encapsulated in stills.
By Staff and Contributors

DECEMBER HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

The best gifts for the holiday season.




PHOTO BY KAIT DEVIR / ATHLETES UNLIMITED

Kayla Wood is a candidate for Best Glow Up after her breakout summer with Athletes Unlimited Lacrosse.


FREE PLAY
DECEMBER 2021

FROM NASHVILLE TO SPARKS
USA SELECT

It's all country for Grace Hasselbeck, continuing a family tradition with USA Select.
By Grace Hasselbeck

THIS FELT DIFFERENT
USA SELECT

What it meant for a son of Haitian and St. Lucian immigrants to suit up for USA.
By Nigel Vital

THE STACHE
HERO BALL

Brad Smith, dapper do-it-all.
By Matt Hamilton; Illustration by Alyssa March

TRENDING
USALAXMAGAZINE.COM AND SOCIAL MEDIA

Fall Ball Focus, McCabe Millon's college decision and more.
By Matt DaSilva

GIVE & GO
J.T. GILES-HARRIS

Chinese food and quote stacking with Chrome defenseman and U.S. hopeful.
By Matt Hamilton